WILDFLOWERS OF NEW MEXICO

 
 

Densely branching from a woody root crown, these 4–18-inch tall  plants form rounded to flat-topped arrays covered with white flowers. Note the oblong, white petal-like ray flowers, and the erect, protruding yellow disk flowers, and narrow leaves with 1 vein.


FLOWER: April–October, especially after rains. The 4–7 white, petal-like ray flowers are oblong to rounded, 1/4–3/8-inch long (6–10 mm), and slightly drooping. The central disk has 8–13 tiny, yellow florets that fade to brown.


LEAVES: Opposite to crowded. Softly hairy branches have clusters of 2–3, narrow leaves 3/8–3/4-inch long (10–20 mm) by 1/16-inch wide (2 mm), with 1 vein at the base.


HABITAT: Rocky, sandy soils; desert grasslands and scrub.


ELEVATION: 3,500-6,000 feet.


RANGE: AZ, NM, TX.


SIMILAR SPECIES: Another densely branching perennial, Blackfoot Daisy, Melampodium leucanthum, widespread in all but the western and northern border counties, has 7–13 white ray flowers and narrow, linear to lance-shaped leaves 3/4–1 1/8-inches long (20–28 mm).


NM COUNTIES: Southern NM in low-elevation arid habitats; Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Lea, Luna, Roosevelt, Sierra.

 

DESERT  ZINNIA

ZINNIA  ACEROSA

Aster Family, Asteraceae

Perennial herb

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Narrow leaves with one main vein are crowded in clusters of 2–3 on the stems.

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