WILDFLOWERS OF NEW MEXICO

 
 

Standing 3-feet tall with stems covered with spreading hairs, this large-scale plant has small-scale flowers. The stem often branches into 3 or more terminal spikes with tiny purple flowers that bloom in a ring from the bottom upward. Note the 4-angled stems.


FLOWERS: June–October. Dense spikes to 3/8-inch diameter (1 cm) bear tiny, tube-shaped flowers about 1/4-inch wide (6 mm) that open into 5 spreading petal-like lobes. The sepals supporting the petals are densely hairy and pointed and equal or shorter than the bracts.


LEAVES: Opposite. Blades oblong-elliptic to oval, 2 3/8–4-inches long (6–10 cm), densely hairy with prominent veins and coarse, irregular teeth, tips pointed.


HABITAT: Gravelly, loam soils, meadows, roadsides, disturbed areas; pinyon juniper, yellow/ponderosa-Douglas fir forests.


ELEVATION: 5,900–9,000 feet.


RANGE: AZ, CO, NM.


SIMILAR SPECIES: This the most common tall Verbena in NM. The tall, stout, hairy stems, dense spike, and hairy, toothed leaves help identify this species.


NM COUNTIES: Nearly statewide (not reported in eastern plains) in NM mountains in mid- to high-elevation habitats: Bernalillo, Catron, Chaves, Cibola, Colfax, Dona Ana, Grant, Lincoln, Los Alamos, McKinley, Mora, Otero, Rio Arriba, San Juan, San Miguel, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Sierra, Socorro, Taos, Torrance, Union, Valencia.

 

SPIKE  VERBENA

VERBENA  MACDOUGALII

Verbena Family, Verbenaceae

Perennial herb

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Leaves are densely hairy with prominent veins and coarse, irregular teeth, and pointed tips.

Each stem usually divides into three or more branches to 3-feet tall.

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