WILDFLOWERS OF NEW MEXICO

 

This tough succulent with erect stems to 8-inches tall, usually in clusters, loves harsh mountain slopes and rocky ridges. Look for the clusters of dark-red flowers and crowded fleshy leaves circling the stem.


FLOWERS: May–September. Dense, flat-topped, terminal clusters of reddish-purple flowers with 5 tiny pointed petals to 1/4-inch long (6 mm), 5 stamens longer than petals.


LEAVES: Alternate, densely crowded on stem. Blades elliptic to oval, to 2-inches long (5 cm), tips pointed, margins entire to irregularly toothed.


HABITAT: Sandy, gravelly loam soils, rock crevices, boulders, talus; spruce-fir forests, alpine meadows and tundra.


ELEVATION: 8,000–13,200 feet.


RANGE: CO, NM, UT; Rocky Mountain states and westward.


SIMILAR SPECIES: Queen’s Crown, R. rhodantha (see photo), in northern NM mountains, has a rounded cluster of pink flowers and slender leaves.


NM COUNTIES: Widespread in NM mountains at high-elevation habitats: Bernalillo, Cibola, Colfax, Dona Ana, Lincoln, Los Alamos, Mora, Otero, Rio Arriba, Santa Fe, San Juan, San Miguel, Sandoval, Socorro, Taos.

KING’S  CROWN,  LEDGE  STONECROP

RHODIOLA  INTEGRIFOIA  (SEDUM  INTREGRIFOLUM)

Stonecrop Family, Crassulaceae

Perennial succulent

THE CONTENTS OF THIS WEBSITE ARE COPYRIGHTED AND CANNOT BE USED

WITHOUT PERMISSION OF GEORGE OXFORD MILLER

SIMILAR SPECIES

HOME          SCIENTIFIC NAME          FAMILY NAME           SEARCH YELLOW          SEARCH RED          SEARCH BLUE


SEARCH WHITE         SEARCH CACTI         SEARCH LEAFLESS         GLOSSARY

RETURN

Email Me