WILDFLOWERS OF NEW MEXICO

 

With numerous stems and branches, this distinctive mountain shrub can reach 5-feet tall and wide and be covered with dense clusters of yellow flowers. Note the triangular leaves with long, tapering points. It prefers rocky, often steep, habitats.


FLOWERS: July–October. Dense clusters with up to 30 small, yellow flower heads, each head with disk flowers only; phyllaries beneath the florets are ribbed, in a single row, and hairy.


LEAVES: Opposite. Leaves with stems (petioles) to 1 3/4-inches long (45 mm), blades to 4 3/4-inches long and wide (12 cm), triangular with tapering point.


HABITAT: Dry rocky soils, talus slopes, cliffs, canyons, meadows, roadsides; pinyon-juniper, ponderosa, Douglas fir forests.


ELEVATION: 5,500–10,000 feet.


RANGE: AZ, CA, CO, NM, NV, OK, TX.


SIMILAR SPECIES: The yellow flower clusters with only disk florets and the triangular, tapering leaves distinguish this shrubby member of the Aster family.


NM COUNTIES: Statewide except se fourth, in mid- to high-elevation dry habitats: Bernalillo, Catron, Cibola, Colfax, Dona Ana, Grant, Harding, Lincoln, Los Alamos, Luna, McKinley, Mora, Otero, Rio Arriba, San Juan, San Miguel, Santa Fe, Sandoval, Sierra, Socorro, Taos, Union, Valencia.

TAPERLEAF

PERICOME  CAUDATA

Aster Family, Astraceae

Perennial shrub

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