WILDFLOWERS OF NEW MEXICO

 

No mistaking this flower for a lily with its 1–2-foot tall stems and showy, bright orange flowers. Note the tapering, curled-back petals with dark dots near the base. Though widespread from North Dakota to Maine, this beautiful flower is rare and endangered in NM, CO, and TX.


FLOWERS: June–August. Clusters of 1–3 erect, orange to red-magenta flowers on stem tips; each flower with 6 sepals, 6 petals, and 6 stamens, petals 2–3-inches (5–7.7 cm) long, pointed, tapering to a narrow base with space between the base of the petals; lower half of petals have dark dots to guide insects to nectar glands.


LEAVES: Alternate on stem but whorls of 4–11 leaves near the top. Blades elliptic to linear, 1 1/8–4-inches (2.9–10.2 cm) long, 1/8–1-inch (0.3–2.3 cm) wide.


HABITAT: Moist sandy soils, steam banks, springs; open mixed-conifer, aspen forests.


ELEVATION: 7,700–10,000 feet.


RANGE: Widespread across northern U. S. from Montana to Maine.


SIMILAR SPECIES: The large, showy, orange flower make this lily unique in NM.


NM COUNTIES: Northern NM and Sacramento mountains in mid- to high-elevation, moist habitats: Los Alamos, Otero, Rio Arriba, San Miguel, Sandoval.

WOOD  LILY

LILIUM  PHILADELPHICUM

Lily Family, Liliaceae

Perennial herb

THE CONTENTS OF THIS WEBSITE ARE COPYRIGHTED AND CANNOT BE USED

WITHOUT PERMISSION OF GEORGE OXFORD MILLER

Lower stem leaves are alternate, but upper leaves in whorls around the stem (arrow).

HOME          SCIENTIFIC NAME          FAMILY NAME           SEARCH YELLOW          SEARCH RED          SEARCH BLUE


SEARCH WHITE         SEARCH CACTI         SEARCH LEAFLESS         GLOSSARY

EMAIL ME