WILDFLOWERS OF NEW MEXICO

 

Thick stands of this robust plant with 20–60-inch tall, branching stems cover open forests and mountain meadows. The arching, 1–2-foot long frond-like leaves divided into numerous parsley-like segments, and the umbrella-shaped flower stalks tipped with clusters of tiny white flowers. Note the flowering cluster (umbel) does not have tiny leaf-like bracts at the base. The roots are still prized by Native Americans and curanderas for their medicinal properties.


FLOWERS: June–August. Clusters (umbels) with numerous umbrella-like rays, each topped with a small terminal umbel of tiny, white flowers; each flower 3/16-inch (2–5 mm) wide with 5 white, fan-shaped petals. The primary umbel has leaf-like bracts at the base, but the small flowering umbel at the tip of each ray does not. Fruit is a cluster of oblong, ribbed capsules 3/16–3/8-inch (5–8 mm) long, maturing reddish.


LEAVES: Basal and alternate on stems. Basal leaves with 3 1/2–12 1/2-inch long (9–32 cm) stems (petioles). Blades compound, oval in outline, 3 1/2–12-inches (9–30 cm) long, leaflets deeply dissected into lance-shaped, parsley-like segments; upper leaves grow from dilated sheaths around stem. Note the lateral veins of the leaflets end at the tips, not in the notches.


HABITAT: Rich, moist soils of open forests, meadows; pine-oak to spruce-fir forests.


ELEVATION: 7,000–11,500 feet.


RANGE: AZ, CO, ID, NM, NV, UT, WY.


SIMILAR SPECIES: Two related deadly poison species also occur in moist soils: Poison Hemlock, Conium maculatum, has purple-splotched stems, and the small flowering umbel at the tip of each ray has tiny, leaf-like bracts at the base. Water Hemlock, Circuta maculata, has undivided leaflets with toothed margins.


NM COUNTIES: Mountains throughout NM in mid- to high-elevation moist habitats: Bernallilo, Catron, Cibola, Colfax, Dona Ana, Grant, Lincoln, McKinley, Mora, Otero, Rio Arriba, San Juan, San Miguel, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Sierra, Socorro, Taos, Torrance, Union.

OSHÁ

LIGUSTICUM PORTERI

Parsley Family, Apiaceae

Perennial herb

THE CONTENTS OF THIS WEBSITE ARE COPYRIGHTED AND CANNOT BE USED

WITHOUT PERMISSION OF GEORGE OXFORD MILLER

  1. 1.Rays of the umbel spread like spokes of an umbrella (left arrow).

  2. 2.Each umbel ray is tipped with a smaller umbel of tiny, white flowers (right arrow).

Each 1–2-foot leaf has a midrib (lower arrow) lined with leaflets that are divided into distinct parsley-like segments (upper arrow).

Fruit is a cluster of oblong, ribbed capsules that turn reddish.

HOME          SCIENTIFIC NAME          FAMILY NAME           SEARCH YELLOW          SEARCH RED          SEARCH BLUE


SEARCH WHITE         SEARCH CACTI         SEARCH LEAFLESS         GLOSSARY

EMAIL ME