WILDFLOWERS OF NEW MEXICO

 

This low-climbing vine twines through grass, climbs wildflowers and bushes, and can turn a brush pile into a blooming garden. Note the light to dark blue, funnel-shaped flowers with a white center, and leaves with deep lobes. Flowers open in the morning and close by noon.


FLOWER: April–October. The light blue flowers have 5 fused petals that form a 2–3-inch long trumpet that opens 2–3-inches wide with a white throat; sepals with scattered hairs not obscuring the surface.


LEAVES: Alternate. Blades 1–3 1/2-inches long (2.5–9 cm), heart-shaped in outline deeply cut into 3–7 lobes with both surfaces covered with short hairs.


HABITAT: Gravelly loam, limestone soils, hills, roadsides; desert grasslands and scrub, pinyon-juniper-oak woodlands.


ELEVATION: 3,600–7,000 feet.


RANGE: AZ, NM, TX.


SIMILAR SPECIES: Silky Morning Glory, I. pubscens, in much the same range and habitat, has deeply-lobed leaves, hairy leaves, and hairy sepals wth the surfaces obscured.


NEW MEXICO COUNTIES: Southern NM in low- to mid-elevation, arid habitats: Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Luna, Otero, Torrance.

LINDHEIMER’S  MORNING  GLORY

IPOMOEA LINDHEIMERI

Morning Glory Family, Convolvulaceae

Perennial herbaceous vine

THE CONTENTS OF THIS WEBSITE ARE COPYRIGHTED AND CANNOT BE USED

WITHOUT PERMISSION OF GEORGE OXFORD MILLER

Flowers begin to wilt by mid-morning.

Sepals have scattered hairs not obscuring the surface (arrows).

HOME          SCIENTIFIC NAME          FAMILY NAME           SEARCH YELLOW          SEARCH RED          SEARCH BLUE


SEARCH WHITE         SEARCH CACTI         SEARCH LEAFLESS         GLOSSARY

EMAIL ME