WILDFLOWERS OF NEW MEXICO

 
 

Often forming large clumps 1–3-feet tall and wide, this prairie-clover blooms on 1–2-foot tall, hairless stems with a round to cylindric spike of tiny, white flowers. Note the spike has few or no hairs, the petals are all similar,  and the flowers bloom from the bottom upward.


FLOWERS: May–September. Dense spikes on branch tips with 1/4-inch long (6 mm) white flowers, 5 similar petals, 5 stamens, 5 showy yellow anthers; blooms in a ring around the spike that advances up to the apex. The 1/8-inch long (3 mm) pod doesn’t split open when dried.


LEAVES: Alternate. Blade odd-pinnate, with 5–9 linear to oblong leaflets, each 3/8–1 1/4-inches long (1–3 cm), bottom surface gland-dotted (use lens).


HABITAT: Clay, sandy, gravelly soils, roadsides, disturbed areas; grasslands, pinyon-juniper, ponderosa-oak woodlands.


ELEVATION: 4,000–9,000 feet.


RANGE: Widespread, central U. S. from AZ to GA.


SIMILAR SPECIES: About 30 species of Dalea in NM, some shrubby. Large-spike Prairie-Clover, D. cylindriceps, scattered statewide, also has hairless leaves and 5 stamens but the flower spike reaches 1–7-inches long (2.5–18 cm). White Dalea, D. albiflora in sw NM has a hairy spike of white flowers with 10 stamens and leaves with 19–31 very hairy leaflets.


NM COUNTIES: Statewide in low- to mid-elevation habitats.

 

WHITE  PRAIRIE-CLOVER

DALEA  CANDIDA

Fabaceae, Legume Family

Perennial herb

THE CONTENTS OF THIS WEBSITE ARE COPYRIGHTED AND CANNOT BE USED

WITHOUT PERMISSION OF GEORGE OXFORD MILLER

HOME          SCIENTIFIC NAME          FAMILY NAME           SEARCH YELLOW          SEARCH RED          SEARCH BLUE


SEARCH WHITE         SEARCH CACTI         SEARCH LEAFLESS         GLOSSARY

EMAIL ME