WILDFLOWERS OF NEW MEXICO

 
 

The multiple flowering stems, 12–18 inches tall, from a basal cluster of densely woolly, silvery leaves and dramatic yellow flowers make this one of the showiest plants in the desert. Note the fuzzy-woolly phyllaries beneath the flower head and lobed leaves.


FLOWERS: March–November. Yellow, showy, one bloom on each stem, rays stacked in several rows around disk; 35–60 petal–like ray flowers 3/8–3/4 inch (10–20 mm) long, tip with three notches; yellow central disk.


LEAVES: Basal, alternate on stem. The rosette has densely woolly leaves to 4-inches (10 cm) long with deeply divided lobes. Stem leaves smaller.


HABITAT: Sandy, gravelly, loam soils, roadsides; desert scrub and grasslands, pinion-juniper woodlands.


ELEVATION: 3,000–7,000 feet.


RANGE: AZ , CA , NV , NM , TX , UT.


SIMILAR SPECIES: The numerous ray flowers, single flower heads on unbranched stems, and woolly, lobed leaves help distinguish this species.


NM COUNTIES: Southern half of NM in low- to mid-elevation, arid habitats: Bernalillo, Catron, Cibola, Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Lea, Lincoln, Luna, Otero, San Juan, San Miguel, Sandoval, Sierra, Socorro, Torrance, Valencia.

DESERT  MARIGOLD

BAILEYA  MULTIRADIATA

Aster family, Asteraceae

Biennial or short-lived perennial herb

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