WILDFLOWERS OF NEW MEXICO

 

This widespread wild onion occurs throughout western and central New Mexico in arid desert and plains. Note the bracts around flower cluster have 2–5 nerves, and each plant has 2 basal leaves that are longer than the flower stem (scape). Plants have 1–5 bulbs without basal bulbils (little bulbs) enclosed in a network of coarse fibers. Blooms  in spring.


FLOWER: March–June. A rounded cluster (umbel) with 10–20 small flowers blooms atop a 2–7 3/4-inch tall (5–20 cm) stem (scape); flowers bell-shaped (spreading open) to urn-shaped (constricted near top); 5/16–1/2-inch long (8–12 mm); 6 white to pink petals with reddish midstrip, tips pointed to rounded, stamens enclosed. Bracts around flower cluster have 2–5 nerves. Flowers do not form bulbils.


LEAVES: Basal, two per scape (flower stalk). Blades solid, channeled, 3–7 3/4-inches long (8–20 cm).


HABITAT: Sandy, gravelly soils; below pinyon-juniper woodlands in western and central NM deserts and plains.


ELEVATION: 4,400–7360 feet.


RANGE: AZ, CO, NM, TX, UT.


SIMILAR SPECIES: Plains Onion, A. perdulce, common in deserts and plains of eastern NM, has deep-rose to white flowers with a red midstrip, 3 leaves per scape, and is the only onion in NM with (usually) fragrant flowers.


NM COUNTIES: Central and western NM in mid- to low-elevation habitats: Bernalillo, Catron, Chaves, De Baca, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Guadalupe, Hidalgo, Lincoln, Los Alamos, Luna, McKinley, Mora, Otero, Rio Arriba, San Juan, San Miguel, Sandoval, Sierra, Socorro, Torrance, Union, Valencia.

LARGE-PETALED  WILD  ONION

ALLIUM  MACROPETALUM

Onion Family, Alliaceae (formerly in Lily Family, Liliaceae)

Perennial herb

THE CONTENTS OF THIS WEBSITE ARE COPYRIGHTED AND CANNOT BE USED

WITHOUT PERMISSION OF GEORGE OXFORD MILLER

Bracts around flower cluster have 2–5 reddish nerves.

HOME          SCIENTIFIC NAME          FAMILY NAME           SEARCH YELLOW          SEARCH RED          SEARCH BLUE


SEARCH WHITE         SEARCH CACTI         SEARCH LEAFLESS         GLOSSARY

EMAIL ME