WILDFLOWERS OF NEW MEXICO

 
 

As the common name implies, this mountain-meadow flower is the size of a dandelion but distinctively orange. Leafless flower stems grow from a basal rosette of leaves. Note the flower heads with ray flowers only and the milky sap.


FLOWERS: June–August. Head 3/8–3/4 inch wide (10–20 mm), burnt orange, rarely pink, on tip of hairy, leafless flower stalk (peduncle); 15–100 petal-like ray flowers with serrated tips, phyllaries beneath flower head hairy with purple-black blotches; no disk flowers.


LEAVES: All basal with purplish stem (petiole). Blades 2 3/4–15 inches long (7–38 cm), linear grass-like to lance-shaped, margins entire, occasionally with a few teeth or lobes.


HABITAT: Gravel-loam soils, moist meadows, open slopes, roadsides; ponderosa spruce-fir forests.


ELEVATION: 7,000–12,500 feet.


RANGE: Western U. S., Canada.


SIMILAR SPECIES: Three yellow species of Agoseris occur in NM. A. glauca has hairless flower stems;  A. heterophylla has no purple on the basal leaf stems; A. parviflora basal leaves have 5–8 lobes. Orange Skyflower, Pyrrocoma crocea, in mountainous habitats, has leafy stems, 30–90 narrow, yellow to orange ray flowers, and 100+ disk flowers.


NM COUNTIES: Mountains throughout NM in mid- high-elevation, moist habitats.

BURNT-ORANGE  DANDELION

AGOSERIS  AURANTIACA

Asterceae, Aster Family

Perennial herb

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